Category Archives: sustainable

Sustainable Development; Renewable Energy, Green Building, Water Conservation, Advanced Energy Storage…What’s all this mean?

Sustainable Development (SD) must be our way of living today and moving forward.  Wikipedia explains Sustainable Development as:  ‘a process for meeting human development goals while maintaining the ability of natural systems to continue to provide the natural resources and ecosystem services upon which the economy and society depend.’  Do a Google search and you’ll see there are many different definitions for Sustainable Development.  Since I like to keep things simple, we’ll break down Sustainable Development in Three Simple Ways:

“Three Pillars of Sustainability”
  • Environment
  • Society
  • Economy

Environment; ecosystem, ecology, earth.

We rely on earth and her ecosystems for life (air, water, food, shelter, etc.).  Therefore, as Earths dependents, we must all work together to always consider her and protect her and the natural resources she offers us.

Society; us, humanity, social equality.

We rely on earths natural resources (food, water, air, shelter) for survival and must, at all costs, protect and replenish her natural ecosystems while being mindful of humanities societal needs today and for future generations.  We, most of humanity, has also come to rely on our economic system and many of us are working toward economic growth for ourselves.

“Sustainability enables Earth to continue supporting our life.”

Economy; economic growth.

Economies are created and ran by humanity.  We know that humanity (society) depends on earth.  Therefore our economy must also depend on Earth and her many natural resources.  One definition of economic growth is, ‘an increase in the amount of goods and services produced per head of the population over a period of time.’  Economic growth must be re-defined and re-purposed being mindful of our environment(s) and maintaining and replenishing earths natural resources and ecosystems.  The updated definition of ‘economic growth’ should also consider an improved quality of life with less resource consumption and waste.

Solar Power vs. Coal…where do you want to live & receive energy from?

 

Sustainable development, simply put, is the process of meeting humanities survival needs (air, water, food, shelter) while maintaining and replenishing the environment and all of earths natural resources and ecosystems to improve human quality of life with decreased resource consumption balancing toward social equality.

Thank you for taking time and reading this information.  And please share this if you believe it may provide value to others.

Jimi Holt

Advantages of Solar Power Photovoltaic (PV) Arrays on Apartment Complex Rooftops

Investing in a solar photovoltaic (PV) system can be the single best investment that an Apartment Complex owner will ever make. Solar will provide the apartment complex owner with a serious competitive advantage over other apartment complex competitors that do not invest in solar. All apartment complex owners that do not invest in solar today will be forced pay higher and higher prices for electricity as the electric utility companies continue to increase their electricity rates as the cost for coal and gas increase and carbon taxes are implemented by the federal government.

Solar PV on Apartment Complex

Top 10 Reasons to Install Solar Panels on Apartment Complex Rooftops:

    Solar provides apartment complex owners with a competitive edge:

  • Installing solar power on apartment complex rooftops provides building owners with a competitive edge
    There are many advantages of installing solar power on apartment complex rooftops, but the #1 reason that an apartment complex owner should install solar is because it will give their apartment complex a huge competitive advantage as utility electricity rate hikes continue to drive monthly electricity bills higher and higher. In 15 year’s time, the apartment complex owner that installs solar will be paying the same amount for electricity every year. But the apartment complex owner across the street will probably see their electricity costs double or triple in less than 15 years. Most apartment complex owners can either pass this savings onto their tenants or significantly increase their profit margins compared to the competition.

    Solar provides apartment complex owners with free electricity:

  • Installing solar power on apartment complex rooftops produces free electricity
    Using an apartment complex rooftop to produce your own free electricity is hard to beat. Imagine how much money you would save each month if you did not have to pay your apartment complex’s electricity bill. And most apartment complex owners have large parking lots too. Why not install solar in the parking lots and provide your customers with shaded parking covers?

    Solar protects apartment complex owners against electricity rate hikes:

  • Installing solar power on apartment complex rooftops protects against electricity rate hikes for 25 years
    Typical electricity rates increase an average of 6% a year. A solar power panel is guaranteed to produce free electricity for 25 years, but many solar panels last 30-40 years. To see why free electricity is important, build an excel spreadsheet that multiplies your current electricity bill by 6% each year for the next 25 years. At a 6% increase per year, a $1,000 monthly electric will increase to more than $3,820 per month in 25 years. Why not protect your apartment complex against future electric rate hikes?

    Solar allows apartment complex owners to sell electricity for a profit:

  • Installing solar power on apartment complex rooftops allows owners to sell electricity to their tenants
    If your apartment complex has tenants, then you can sell your clean green electricity for a profit. Your tenants would be happy to buy electricity from you instead of the utility company if you give them a 10% discount. Installing solar power on the apartment complex rooftop is similar to installing ATM machines that significantly improve your monthly cash flow. If the apartment complex has no tenants, the apartment complex owner has the option sell the electricity back to the utility through Arizona’s Net Metering policy.

    Solar provides apartment complex owners with MACRS depreciation and huge tax write-offs:

  • Installing solar power on apartment complex rooftops provides MACRS depreciation and huge tax write-offs
    If your apartment complex has a tax liability problem and is looking for a great tax write-off, solar is a great way to take advantage of a 30% federal tax credit and any state tax credit that might be available. MACRS depreciation allows apartment complex owners to depreciate a large percentage of the system cost in the first year of operation. You may not understand the math, but when your accountant reviews the numbers, they may wonder why you had not made this investment sooner.

    Solar protects apartment complex owners against power outages:

  • Installing solar power on apartment complex rooftops provides protection against power outages
    Like diesel backup generators, solar power array can provide electricity when the regular grid has an outage. Electricity can be stored in batteries, large capacitors, flywheels and other types of devices that store energy until it is needed during an emergency or when the sun goes down. The first thing that is usually flown to a tornado, hurricane or earthquake disaster scene is a solar power telecommunications and water purification trailer. If safety is a concern, solar power can provide a fantastic source of emergency power, communications and water purifications for your tenants and employees.

    Solar Renewable Energy Credits (SRECs) can be sold by apartment complex owners for a profit:

  • Installing solar power on apartment complex rooftops allows owners to sell their solar RECs for a profit
    As the world becomes more and more concerned with air pollution and water usage, utility companies are facing regulations that mandate producing a percentage of their electric power from renewable energy sources. Many utilities will not be able to meet their Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) and will be forced to buy RECs from independent power producers. Investing in RECs now can provide a very lucrative return on investment as energy consumption continues to increase and taxing carbon-based power production moves into mainstream regulatory public policy. See this link for more information on SREC trading: www.srectrade.com

    Solar saves the utility companies billions of dollars in reduced fuel and power purchase costs:

  • Solar requires no fuel and produces power where it is actually needed
    A recent research study, the RW Beck Distributed Renewable Energy Operating Impact Research Study, sponsored by Arizona’s largest electric utility company shows that a high penetration level of solar can save a lot of money on the cost to produce electricity. The study illustrates how heavy deployments of solar can save APS approximately $3 billion over the next 15 years by reducing fuel costs, reducing power purchases, reducing operations and maintenance, reducing capital expenditures and reducing the amount of power needed to be generated for the generation, transmission and distribution of electricity.

    “Going Solar” is the best way for apartment complex owners to reduce their carbon footprint:

  • Installing solar power on apartment complex rooftops provides great publicity for reducing pollution
    In addition to saving money, creating jobs, and creating economic development, the best thing about solar power is that it produces zero air pollution. When global warming is a growing problem facing the world installing solar power is one of the best ways for apartment complex owners to reduce their carbon footprint and in the process save a lot of money on future apartment complex electric bills.

    “Going Green” with solar power generates very positive PR publicity:

  • Installing solar power on apartment complex rooftops provides great publicity for “Going Green”
    The local newspaper, TV stations and trade publications like to cover companies that are good stewards for the local community they serve. Installing solar power on apartment complex rooftops is a good way to provide leadership and help migrate as many residential and commercial customers to solar power. It also creates a lot of green collar jobs and installation revenue that can be injected back into the local economy as solar installation companies spend money on office space, a fleet of trucks and the supplies they need to install solar power arrays.

information from Arizona Solar Power Society

Multi-Tasking Solar Modules: Photovoltaic Panels Used in All Situations, Environments, Shapes, Sizes, Colors, Locations

Solar Covered Parking, Photovoltaic Rooftop System

Electricity from solar modules can be produced anywhere on the planet, as long as the sun shines on it.  Solar modules are deployed around the globe today and being used in all different types of situations, locations, and for many purposes.

Solar Modules on side of building

One of the many benefits of solar energy is that the electricity that the system produces from the Sun is FREE.  So if you’re already paying a monthly electric bill to the utility company, instead pay that same money to yourself and invest in a solar system.

Solar Modules were originally used to produce clean, renewable energy.  Now they’re “multi-tasking” and are being asked to serve as vehicle shade structures, architectural building enhancements, overhead shelters, replacing building construction materials, to cover unsightly conditions, etc.  Photovoltaic panels are popping up everywhere and we’re only at the beginning of the solar energy production revolution.

Clear Solar Photovoltaic Modules

When considering going solar and changing from brown, dirty energy to clean, green energy, make sure to review all of your options.  Every site, building, facility has a unique location and situation.  A professional solar developer like AirUs Energy considers all of this as well as the products available on the global solar market to provide custom design solar solutions.

 

7 Impressive Solar Energy Facts (+ charts)

7 impressive solar energy facts (+ charts)

by author:Zachary Shahan

How solar power has changed over the last 10 years

Solar power is in a tremendously different place today than it was in 10 years ago. Below are a handful of impressive stats about solar power’s growth, as well as some general stats about solar energy potential that are also quite noteworthy.

1. Even yearly energy potential from sunshine dwarfs total energy potential from any other source.

The annual energy potential from solar energy is 23,000 TWy. Energy potential from total recoverable reserves of coal is 900 TWy. For petroleum, it’s 240 TWy; and for natural gas, it’s 215 TWy. Wind energy’s yearly energy potential is 25–70 TWy.

[Source: A Fundamental Look at Energy Reserves for the Planet]

2. Approximately 66% of installed world solar PV power capacity has been installed in the past 2½ years.

Furthermore, total installed capacity is projected to double in the coming 2½ years.

[Source: GTM Research]

3. Global solar PV power capacity grew from about 2.2 GW in 2002 to 100 GW in 2012.

From 2007 to 2012, it grew 10 times over, from 10 GW to 100 GW.

[Source: Renewables 2013 Global Status Report]

4. There are now about 1.36 million jobs in the global solar PV industry.

There are also about 892,000 in the solar heating & cooling industry.

[Source: Renewables 2013 Global Status Report]

5. Germany accounted for nearly one third of global solar PV capacity at the end of 2012.

Italy (16%) and Germany (32%) combined accounted for nearly half of global solar PV capacity.

[Source: Renewables 2013 Global Status Report]

6. The price of solar PV panels dropped about 100 times over from 1977 to 2012.

Since 2008, the price of solar PV panels has dropped about 80%.

[Data Source: Bloomberg New Energy Finance / Chart Source: Cost of Solar/Unknown]

7. The sunshine hitting Texas in one month contains more energy than all the oil and gas ever pumped out of the state.

Nonetheless, New Jersey has about 10 times more solar PV power capacity installed than the entire state of Texas.

[Data Source: SEIA / Image Source: 1Sun4All.com]

Those are some of the most impressive solar energy facts and charts I’ve seen, but please let us know if there are some big ones you think I’m missing.

Editor’s note: This is a guest post written by Zachary Shahan, editor of CleanTechnica and Planetsave. The views expressed in this post do not necessarily reflect or represent the views of ABB or its employees.

Solar PV providing light and power to Los Angeles; Santa Monica Pier and Venice Beach Graffiti Art Walls

Solar PV lighting system with Battery Back-up, Venice Beach, CA

If you’re paying attention to the skyline then you’ve seen solar pv arrays being used to provide clean, renewable energy popping up everywhere.  Many homeowners and business owners have made the switch from fossil fuels to solar power, but even the smallest of energy users (see photo left) are also making the move.

Solar Energy can be used anywhere on Earth the sun shines.  We use it to provide energy in remote locations where the ‘grid’ cannot reach as well as in ‘grid’ connected areas to help offset some of the utility company electrical demands.  A solar electric system in conjunction with battery back-up can produce clean, renewable energy throughout the day which can be distributed anytime, even during the utility companies peak charge times to save the most.  The solar lighting system installed at the Venice Beach Art Walls includes a battery back-up system at each light which allows the entire area to shine all night completely off the electrical grid.

Solar PV Array at Santa Monica Pier, California

Keep traveling a little farther north along the bike path and you’ll find the Santa Monica Pier.  Take a closer look (see pic below) and you’ll see a solar PV array helping push the roller coaster and ferris wheel along.  This solar system does not cover all the power required to run the Santa Monica Pier, however one of the many benefits of a solar system is it’s easily expandable.  As us about our proposal to take the Santa Monica Pier completely off the utility grid…

Feel free to email, or comment below should you have questions or opportunities to discuss.

Thanks for spreading the word,

Jimi Holt

 

The Key to Exponential Solar Growth Is Virtual Net Metering — and Solar Companies

 

On August 15, 2012, at 8 a.m., Colorado’s Xcel utility opened up its registration for a new solar gardens/virtual net metering program. It took just 30 minutes to shut the doors on applications. The utility had received 13.5 MW in those 30 minutes, more than triple the 4.5 MW allowed. This excitement is one reason why I believe that community solar is the key to widespread U.S. solar adoption, but let’s go through all of them…plus the challenges to it ever happening.

Right now there are relatively few solar gardens/net metering/community solar programs in the United States. The most notable and successful ones are in Sacramento via the SMUD, as well as an earlier solar gardens program in Colorado. Currently, California law allows for community solar on site, limiting roof space on buildings. However, a new bill, SB 843, will allow off-site solar virtual net metering, a.k.a. community solar.

Another reason why I’m bullish on widespread community solar is Solar Mosaic, a new company that allows individuals to invest in solar through a Solar PPA model. Here, instead of a utility bill directly benefiting from the watts, a consumer invests in a large solar PPA project and basically becomes an equity partner, earning an ROI.

In the two models above, roof or property ownership is not required, so renters and tree-lined-street lovers can enjoy solar benefits and savings. Also, because the actual solar installation is off-site, perfect insolation, roof age, home-owner vanity, and belligerent home owner associations are no longer in the way of sales. In addition, unlike physical PV, these panels can virtually follow you to a new residence, though typically within the same utility area.

Although the formulas for crediting your utility bill (or bank account in the case of Solar Mosaic) will vary by state and utility, one constant remains: Consumers or businesses can buy or lease a part of a large solar PV farm and benefit financially, regardless of location or property ownership.

From a solar market and marketing perspective, the above paragraph is revolutionary. On the surface, community solar models completely democratize solar power. Capital, access to loans, or a good credit score will still be required, but beyond those qualifications, community solar models could be accessible to millions of renters in large urban cities, or even rural off-grid residents who can invest and indirectly save on energy costs via a solar mosaic-type model.

Even more exciting from an untapped solar market perspective is the latest National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) report, which estimates that the annual technical potential in the United States for urban utility-scale PV is 2,232 terawatt-hours (TWh)! For rural utility-scale PV, there is an estimated U.S. technical potential of 280,613 TWh!

Sounds fantastic, eh? But we can’t get giddy just yet.

Four little things stand in the way of solar PV nirvana, and that’s where you, dear solar capitalist reader, will have to roll up your sleeves and work very, very hard. Because, while these models and technical solar potential exist, the industry will have to overcome the following general challenges:

1) Energy politics. California being the leader that it is in solar, I have high confidence that SB 843 will pass both state legislators and be signed by Governor Brown. But the same model will not be adapted in Alabama or Mississippi, or even the blue state of Illinois. Fossil fuel interests and utility monopolies will not see their revenues and market share decrease without a battle with their legislators/regulators and on their local airwaves.

The solution: Diving into energy politics. Solar companies, large and small, can’t sit on the sidelines. Not only must they lobby and get to know their state legislators, they must spend the time to rally public opinion and explain the value of these models. And that brings me to:

2) Public education. Even without mentioning virtual net metering, the vast majority of U.S. rate payers are still believing in the 1980’s mindset of expensive and unreliable solar. Some don’t know the difference between solar PV and solar thermal. While the old mindset is slowing getting modernized, we’re far from there yet. On top of traditional models, now we have to add education about community solar, community solar purchasing versus a leasing model, and the Solar Mosaic option. Solar marketers and educators are already challenged, but sure, let’s pile on community solar.

The solution: Educate customers now. While this may appear to conflict with current sales, the public needs to understand their solar options, as well as be able to support legislative efforts to make virtual net metering available everywhere. To do your part, have a section on your website that explains and keeps track of local community solar initiatives. Link to local community solar advocates who are pushing for your local legislation. Bottom line, explain community solar and get people excited about the concept.

3) Outdated utility business models.  Related to #1, but more specific. American power is currently stuck in a very old business model where a single energy provider collects and distributes grid-connected power to homes and businesses. In Germany, sign a two page agreement, and anyone with a solar panel or wind turbine can sell power to the Utility.  Here in the U.S., the “smart grid” and its related technologies will slowly change the way we create, deliver, consume, and pay for energy, but we’re not even close to any new utility business model. Utilities know they will lose revenue when customers participate in community solar farms. And yet, the grid costs money, especially if it’s to be improved…some day.

The solution: There’s no easy one here. Utilities and solar companies just have to start thinking about creating new energy business models that complement each other. Both businesses need each other for now, although battery storage technology may one day eliminate the need for net metering for some customers. For others, grid-tied storage services and distribution services, either from deserts or rooftops, will be required. Nevertheless, utilities have the monopolies today, and that limits consumer choice. So, until consumers have a choice of distribution services and community solar is available to all, any argument in 2012 that solar customers must pay more for “their fair share” of grid distribution is ridiculous. When the utilities open the doors to true energy choice via community solar, then public utility commissions can discuss consumers paying extra for solar energy transmission and the fair value of that service.

4) Improving grid infrastructure. #3 above is about business models. Here, we have a physical and economic problem. The American grid is old and inefficient. The more solar farms we grow, the more updated smart power technology and power lines will be needed. So, while we may be able to change political minds, educate the public, and create new utility business models, little happens without physically building a new, modern electric grid, especially in rural sunny areas that have the most solar production potential.

The solution: The solutions are 1, 2, and 3 above. Utilities will either need to be forced to create updated grid infrastructure via legislation and taxpayer/ratepayer funding, or they may voluntarily do it with an innovative business model that shows an ROI. Either way, the smart grid and new transmission lines won’t happen without political advocacy, public education, and win-win community solar business models.

Want a great resource for implementing Community Solar? Then go to Vote Solar and see their terrific community solar tool kit.

One more thing about community solar’s main-streaming potential: Besides democratizing the grid and solar power, community solar will benefit all sectors of the solar industry. Obviously, the more solar farms created via new laws, the more solar products manufactured, distributed, sold, and installed, creating jobs and profits.

Implementing community solar not only has growth potential for solar businesses, it’s also a personal goal. Because as much as I’m a part of the solar industry and a passionate solar advocate, I grew up in Manhattan and lived most of my adult life in various Los Angeles residences where solar was either not possible (apartment) or practical (trees). Community solar can change that for me and for millions like me. The change starts with all of us tackling the above steps… and UnThinking Solar.

Tor Valenza a.k.a. “Solar Fred” advises solar companies on marketing, communications, and branding. Contact him through UnThink Solar or follow him on Twitter @SolarFred.

Obama Sets National CHP Target To Increase Industrial Energy Efficiency And Reduce Demand On Oil And Coal

President Obama yesterday signed an executive order that sets a national goal of 40 GW of new combined heat and power (CHP) by the end of 2020. Additionally, the Department of Energy’sBetter Buildings, Better Plants program yesterday announced that five companies — Kingspan Insulated Panels, semiconductor manufacturer Cree, General Aluminum Manufacturing Company, PaperWorks and Harbec, a maker of machine tools and injection-molded plastic parts — have signed on, and committed to improving their energy intensity by 25 percent over 10 years.

Partners in the Better Buildings, Better Plants program have already realized at least $80 million in cost savings, according to the DoE. These actions are expected to save about $1 billion cumulatively by 2020.

The executive order intends to accelerate investments in industrial energy efficiency, which could save manufacturers at least $100 billion in energy costs over the next decade, according to the White House. Meeting the President’s 40 GW CHP goal would mean $40 billion to $80 billion of new capital investment in American manufacturing facilities. But the White House says investments in industrial energy efficiency, including CHP, incur as little as half the cost of traditional forms of new baseload power.

Other benefits include reduced nationwide GHG emissions and enhanced grid security.

The executive order directs agencies to hold ongoing regional workshops with information about best practice, policies and investment models, and directs the EPA, along with the Departments of Energy, Commerce and Agriculture, to coordinate actions at the federal level while providing policy and technical assistance to states to promote investments in industrial energy efficiency.

In support of the executive order, DoE and EPA released a report, Combined Heat and Power: A Clean Energy Solution, that discusses ways to achieve 40 GW of new CHP by 2020. Environmental Leader examines that report in greater detail here.

Obama made the announcement on the day that Mitt Romney accepted the Republican Party’s nomination to run against the president in November, and just two days after the White House finalized a rule to require cars and light trucks to achieve 54.5 miles per gallon by 2025. Reuters said that as Congress has repeatedly blocked Obama’s efforts to pass energy and climate legislation – including measures to encourage investment in CHP – the administration has turned to its executive agencies as a means of achieving its goals.

In his acceptance speech yesterday, Romney said of Obama’s environmental policies, “His assault on coal and gas and oil will send energy and manufacturing jobs to China.”

The global market for commercial CHP systems will reach $11.2 billion by 2022, with 80 GWe installed by that year, according to a report by Pike Research published earlier this month. California has set a goal of 4 GW of new CHP generation in the state by 2020, with 1990 as a baseline.

Harbec, one of the new private sector commitments to the Better Plants program, has set a goal of becoming a carbon neutral company by 2013.

From:

http://www.environmentalleader.com/

Going Green Solar and Erus Builders latest Solar Photovoltaic and Solar Thermal System Installations. Our customers took advantage of the current Solar Photovoltaic and Solar Water Heater opportunities.

Solar Electric Photovoltaic System roof modules
Solar Electric Photovoltaic System roof modules

Going Green Solar and Erus Builders have partnered to offer an opportunity for homeowners in Arizona to reduce the cost of their energy bills by having a Solar Energy System installed.  With current local Utility Rebates and Tax Incentives a Solar Photovoltaic (PV) System along with a Solar Water Heating System will quickly pay for itself and start to make you money.  We offer multiple financing options which, in many cases, the payment will be offset by the savings from the solar systems. Please contact us for a free energy audit and education on our energy saving systems.

Erus Builders and Going Green Solar decided to work with Enphase Energy on our Solar PV Systems due to their cutting edge micro-inverter technology.  This new concept is more efficient than standard Photovoltaic inverter systems and easier to design and install and is rapidly changing the solar photovoltaic industry. Please contact us for additional information.

Solar PV and Solar Water Heating System
Solar PV and Solar Water Heating System

Local utility companies continue to raise their price for electricity to us and the solar rebates they offer are continually decreasing.  This opportunity to get free money from them is running out so please take advantage now to create a free asset for yourself that will continue to pay you as long as the sun continues to shine.

Contact:  Jim Holt at jamesholt@cox.net and 480-580-5980.

SunEdison Uses Enphase Microinverters on a Solar Energy System at a Power Plant

California, United States [RenewableEnergyWorld.com]

SunEdison has completed the installation and commissioning of a solar energy system using the Enphase Microinverter System at one of their New Jersey power plants. This site represents the first Enphase installation with SunEdison and the latest commercial installation using the Enphase Microinverter System.

“SunEdison chose the Enphase Microinverter System for its reliability, system availability, and easy integration with our SEEDS monitoring and controls platform,” said Mark Culpepper, chief technology officer, SunEdison. “The site has been running for three months and has been running at an Operating Performance Ratio of close to 120 percent. It’s one of the best-performing sites in our fleet.”

Enphase Microinverter Systems convert the DC output of a single solar module into grid compliant AC power. These systems offer a number of advantages over traditional inverters, the company said, including an increase in energy harvest, increased system reliability and a simpler installation. Additionally, Enphase said the balance-of-system (BOS) and labor costs can be reduced by up to 15 percent compared with systems installed with traditional inverters.

Click below to watch this very informative video of an interview with the Co-founder of Enphase Energy.

Click Here

Contact us for a free quote and energy analysis to install an Enphase Solar Energy System on you home or commercial building.  We also provide Solar Hot Water Heating Systems.

Voice:  480-580-5980

Email:  jamesholt@cox.net

Go Green With a Solar Hot Water Heater, The Most Cost Effective Sustainable Option For Your Home Or Business

Many people in the U.S. can produce more than half their domestic hot water needs with a solar hot water system. In

Solar Hot Water Heater
Solar Hot Water Heater

Arizona and other southern regions of the US this can be more than 80% savings.  A solar hot water system costs more than a conventional water heater, typically between $7,000 and $8,000.  However, after rebates and tax incentives the cost to the client for a new solar hot water heater including a new tank is $2 – 3,000.  Homeowners may want to budget for routine maintenance on some units to include periodic checks on the pH of the system’s with glycol solution.

A gas water heater should never be used as the only tank in a solar hot water system. In a solar storage tank, water stratifies by temperature; cool water from the bottom of the tank is pulled up to the collectors on the roof to be heated then returned to the top of the tank. The colder the incoming water, the higher the solar collector’s efficiency. In a single tank system, the electric element or gas flame keeps the stored water hot, leaving no cold water available to send to the solar collectors. Solar hot water systems can be either active or passive. Most solar hot water systems use a pump to move fluid through one or two collectors. Thermosiphon systems, suitable for simple domestic hot water systems in frost-free climates, rely on natural convection to move water.

As mentioned above, in most cases, credits or rebates can defray some of the cost of installing a solar water heater and are available from local utilities or state and federal governments. Solar

Solar Hot Water Heater Roof Collectors
Solar Hot Water Heater Roof Collectors

systems offer stability and predictability when it comes to energy costs and supply. That’s not something that any system running on fossil fuels can match.

Please contact us for additional information anything building or construction related to include Solar or a free quote on Solar Hot Water Heater Systems and Solar Electric Photovoltaic Systems.

Jim Holt

Erus Builders

Contact:  jamesholt@cox.net